Archive for February, 2012

Import your tweets into Fluidinfo

Monday, February 6th, 2012

If you import your tweets into Fluidinfo, you can use our new web interface to see interesting information about all the @names, #hashtags and URLs you’ve mentioned on Twitter. To get going, just go to Fluidinfo and log in with Twitter (top right).

Fluidinfo will fetch your past tweets from Twitter and will examine them for all the @names, #hashtags, and URLs you’ve ever mentioned. That will probably take some minutes to complete (reload the page to check the import status).

For each of your tweets, we extract the @names, #hashtags, and URLs it mentions and we add to the Fluidinfo page for each of them. To make this more concrete, here are examples from people who have already imported their tweets into Fluidinfo:

Example: the #occupy hashtag Here’s the Fluidinfo page for #occupy. Click the links on the left of that page to explore different views of #occupy information in Fluidinfo and across the web. For example, you can see mentions of #occupy by Paul Kedrosky, mentions of #occupy by Tim O’Reilly, and mentions of #occupy by Ethan Zuckerman. On the right is a screenshot that shows some of how #occupy appears to me when I look at my friends’ mentions of it (click to see a larger version). Along with the page for #occupy, Fluidinfo has a page for every hashtag.


Example: a URL In December 2011, Fred Wilson blogged about Freedom To Innovate. Fluidinfo has a page for the URL of Fred’s post. Click the links on the left of that page to explore. Later, Tim O’Reilly tweeted about the post. Tim has imported his tweets into Fluidinfo, so you can see his "mentioned" tag on the URL of Fred’s post. Brad Feld, who has also imported his tweets, mentioned Fred’s post as well. On the right is a screenshot that shows some of how Fred’s post appears to me when I look at my friends’ mentions of it (click to see a larger version). Along with the page for Fred’s article, Fluidinfo has a page for every URL.

Example: @sarawinge Esther Dyson mentioned (via retweeting) Sara Winge, so on the @sarawinge page in Fluidinfo you should expect to see Esther’s mentions of Sara. If you explore the views on the left of that page, you’ll also see mentions of Sara by @marcprecipice, @pkedrosky, @timoreilly, and others. Along with the page for @sarawinge, Fluidinfo has a page for every @username.

Example: scientific american Just as it does for @names, Fluidinfo tags the user’s name (as given on Twitter). So because Joi Ito has mentioned @sciam (the Twitter account for Scientific American), the "scientific american" page in Fluidinfo has Joi’s mentions of @sciam. The views on the left of that page show mentions of Scientific American by others, as well as lots of other information from across the web. And yes, you guessed it, along with the page for "scientific american", Fluidinfo has a page for every name.

Add to these pages yourself! If you import your tweets, your mentions of @names, hashtags and URLs will also be added to pages in Fluidinfo. But don’t forget that you can also add your own tags to any page at all. After you log in, click the green Tag button to add something. Enter a tag name (e.g., comment) and a value (the text of your comment) and click Submit.

Next up… search In a follow-on post, I’ll show you how to use the secret terminal built into the Fluidinfo. The terminal lets you search your tweets, find things different people have mentioned in common, and much more besides.